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  1. #1
    Knight of Stars pizzadust's Avatar
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    Best way to decrease blunders and mistakes

    What's the best training for decreasing blunders and simple tactical mistakes? I think it's the main thing holding me back rn, would playing lots of rapids and blitz help?

  2. #2
    King of Connect 4 DoflaMihawk's Avatar
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    In a way. It would improve your play under pressure and reaction time, thus you would make less blunders when running low on time in a classical time.

  3. #3
    Gaining experience helps a lot. Most of the time though, blunders happen because we don't evaluate every option properly and don't think in advance.

  4. #4
    previously Kyte DreX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heart View Post
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    What's the best training for decreasing blunders and simple tactical mistakes? I think it's the main thing holding me back rn, would playing lots of rapids and blitz help?
    i always get lost at some point trying to not run out of time


  5. #5
    Knight of Elegance Aliasniamor's Avatar
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    Playing blitz only helps with getting better at playing moves under pressure, and it betters your intuition up to a certain point. The problem is that it lacks depth, and actually playing at slower time controls will allow you to calculate deeper, evaluate more properly the pros and cons of positions and the more and more positions you analyse during games or not the better you'll evaluate similar positions in the future. Which will help you recognize when to be aware of certain tactical possibilities for or against you and if you are more awre to those possibilities you're more likely to see quicker/more often tactics (for or against you, once again) and thus react properly.

    I've never developed as much as when I was playing at slow time controls a lot. Which is why I'm stagnating a bit rn certainly

  6. #6
    PIERCE THE HEAVENS Bold's Avatar
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    why not just read how the best chess players in the world learned how to play and copy what they did

  7. #7
    Knight of Elegance Aliasniamor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bold View Post
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    why not just read how the best chess players in the world learned how to play and copy what they did
    Not all the best players went the same way to get to the top, and all the tips are likely the same for everyone, i.e. play a lot, make a lot of tactical exercices, learn to evaluate positions better and better ... But not everyone has what it takes to make it to GM level though and it's not the same routine that will get one or another to that level if he has it in him to do so

  8. #8
    PIERCE THE HEAVENS Bold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy Alias View Post
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    Not all the best players went the same way to get to the top, and all the tips are likely the same for everyone, i.e. play a lot, make a lot of tactical exercices, learn to evaluate positions better and better ... But not everyone has what it takes to make it to GM level though and it's not the same routine that will get one or another to that level if he has it in him to do so
    ya, exactly. it's good to do an amalgam of things and use them all for a while. Then focus on the ones that have helped you improve the most. Then return to the ones you discarded to see if they can help you again now that you're a better player. like how someone who wants to paint could do a whole host of things like figure drawing, still lifes, master copies etc.

    Yes, not everyone has what it takes to reach GM level. Though that could be because they didn't have access to an extraordinary training program or lacked the persistence/effort required . I recall reading a case where a pair of teachers with no particular chess skill trained their three daughters into three of the top chess players in the world. They did that just to prove a point - that talent is taught.

  9. #9
    Knight of Elegance Aliasniamor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bold View Post
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    ya, exactly. it's good to do an amalgam of things and use them all for a while. Then focus on the ones that have helped you improve the most. Then return to the ones you discarded to see if they can help you again now that you're a better player. like how someone who wants to paint could do a whole host of things like figure drawing, still lifes, master copies etc.

    Yes, not everyone has what it takes to reach GM level. Though that could be because they didn't have access to an extraordinary training program or lacked the persistence/effort required . I recall reading a case where a pair of teachers with no particular chess skill trained their three daughters into three of the top chess players in the world. They did that just to prove a point - that talent is taught.
    Yeah the three daughters were the Polgar sisters. Judith is still the only woman to date who've been in the worl top 10. he second best woman in history barely made it to top 50 and never higher. But those sisters were taught from a very young age so it's a bit different than it is for us. When you're still a child your brain is a bit more "malleable".

  10. #10
    PIERCE THE HEAVENS Bold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy Alias View Post
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    Yeah the three daughters were the Polgar sisters. Judith is still the only woman to date who've been in the worl top 10. he second best woman in history barely made it to top 50 and never higher. But those sisters were taught from a very young age so it's a bit different than it is for us. When you're still a child your brain is a bit more "malleable".
    and they sunk in more hours. This on top of the tens of thousands hours they spent training as adults is what really gives them a headstart, but that's why one would just need to spend more time on the practice to see significant growth. keeping with the art comparison, its why jason manley says it'd take 8 hours of daily and smart practice for three years for one to go from total amateur to professional concept artist.

    also, it's been proven that regular cognitive and physical activity increases this malleability. Other measures such as changes in diet, lowering stress, improving sleep and improving your testosterone all improve it also.

  11. #11
    King of Connect 4 DoflaMihawk's Avatar
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    You guys heard of the 10,000 hour rule? Supposedly you can become a master at any sport or skill or whatever if you spend 10,000 hours of deliberate practice at it.

    I imagine the same applies to chess.

  12. #12
    Knight of Stars pizzadust's Avatar
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    You guys are missing the point, a genius like me should never have to train at any thing, I-it's just wrong

    The thing about learning as a kid is true, it makes a really big difference, even a very fit and healthy adult just can't come close to comparing to how malleable a kids brain is, even if his/hers can be more malleable than the average adult. A

    But that doesn't matter, I was suppose to effortlessly take you all by storm, but all I could do is stagnate at 1500-1600 online elo. I'm not as consistent as i could be, but I do spend a good amount of time playing, and doing puzzles. I feel I'm on the edge of breakthrough though, so maybe things will start coming together and open up the path to the next tier for me.

  13. #13
    King of Connect 4 DoflaMihawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heart View Post
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    But that doesn't matter, I was suppose to effortlessly take you all by storm, but all I could do is stagnate at 1500-1600 online elo. I'm not as consistent as i could be, but I do spend a good amount of time playing, and doing puzzles. I feel I'm on the edge of breakthrough though, so maybe things will start coming together and open up the path to the next tier for me.
    Every player hits their own 'wall' at some point.

    Every wall can be overcome of course, but not everyone has what it takes to do so.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by DoflaMihawk View Post
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    You guys heard of the 10,000 hour rule? Supposedly you can become a master at any sport or skill or whatever if you spend 10,000 hours of deliberate practice at it.

    I imagine the same applies to chess.
    There are some nuances involving the 10.000 hour rule. However to become a master at any sport or competition you must put in alot of time and dedicated practice in order to improve.

    It's the reason I've improved at the rate I have in chess.

    In any endeavor of this sort, you will always reach a plateu which is a period in time where you are working hard but yet don't seem to improve, any would-be master in any field must enjoy the process itself, or they won't persist long enough to break through that plateu.

    This is what real progress looks like.
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy Alias View Post
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    Well I wouldn't want you to lose 5 years of your life only to discover that you'll never beat me
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    Meanwhile ... Fab beat me I'm sorry guys

  15. #15
    King of Connect 4 DoflaMihawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabulous View Post
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    There are some nuances involving the 10.000 hour rule. However to become a master at any sport or competition you must put in alot of time and dedicated practice in order to improve.

    It's the reason I've improved at the rate I have in chess.

    In any endeavor of this sort, you will always reach a plateu which is a period in time where you are working hard but yet don't seem to improve, any would-be master in any field must enjoy the process itself, or they won't persist long enough to break through that plateu.

    This is what real progress looks like.
    Yeah it's definitely gets harder to improve the better you get. I also heard that it takes 20 hours of practice to just get good at a skill.

  16. #16
    Not Gay Drift's Avatar
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    clear ur mind and be all gandhi like


  17. #17
    With all this being said, I think I will probably be surpassed.
    I got accepted into a university.
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy Alias View Post
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    Well I wouldn't want you to lose 5 years of your life only to discover that you'll never beat me
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy Alias View Post
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    Meanwhile ... Fab beat me I'm sorry guys

  18. #18
    Knight of Stars pizzadust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabulous View Post
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    With all this being said, I think I will probably be surpassed.
    I got accepted into a university.
    Well most of us were already in university's, that won't be any excuse for anything

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Heart View Post
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    Well most of us were already in university's, that won't be any excuse for anything
    Do you run a business aswell? All I'm saying is chess will go down in priority which may effect my progress.
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy Alias View Post
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    Well I wouldn't want you to lose 5 years of your life only to discover that you'll never beat me
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy Alias View Post
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    Meanwhile ... Fab beat me I'm sorry guys

  20. #20
    advice from magnus_carlsen3

    It is not uncommon to solve many harder puzzles, but miss simple tactical threats of pin or fork. One of the culprit of this is your thinking process. Discipline yourself at following these. These things help me get better result.

    Always study your opponent's last move

    Don't relax and lose focus. Remember to always study your opponent's last move from the start to the end.

    Before you make a move, check if there is a tactical drawback

    Let say there is a pawn that you can capture with your queen, but doing so will pin your queen against your king. If you don't check for tactical drawback before making a move, you will lose your queen from a pin!

    Look the whole board to see piece positioning

    Let say you have a rook at the far corner and your opponent's queen attack your bishop and rook with a double attack. Your bishop is sitting near at your viewing visibility. There is a tendency that you will only look at the side where your opponent place his piece. As a result you will miss that your rook is also attacked by his queen and will blunder it. The important lesson here is always look at the whole board after your opponent makes a move and before you make a move.

    If your opponent has threat, check first if you have a stronger counter threat or plan before defending.

    Let say your opponent is threatening to capture your queen. But in the given position you can ignore it with a stronger back rank mate. Since you have a better threat, it is obvious you will go for the mate for the win.

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