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  1. #1
    Skraawwk!! Makenzye's Avatar
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    Raven Mini-Series

    Raven got her own series that started this week.




    Quick synopsis: (SPOILER WARNING)
    Raven has traveled to San Francisco in an attempt to create her own life separate from the heroics she's used to and be a normal teenager, and hiding from her siblings. Moves in with an Aunt she didn't know she had who is very religious, which gives an odd situation to Raven who is herself a daughter of the devil. She attends highschool, sees the "normal" nasty stuff of teenagers, makes some friends (who force themselves on her as friends), and discovers an anomaly of another powered being whom is shrouded in mystery.

    So all in all, this really isn't much more than a set up to understand the life of Rachel Roth. Nothing really surprising happens in this issue. Girl moves, encounters culture clash, thinks it might be a mistake, starts to change her mind, encounters mysterious new thing. A pretty semi-standard superhero set up story, but not bad at all since it's one that helps fit her mold pretty well. I do like that she was stuck with bible thumpers (and unintentionally makes a funny about her mom's beliefs to the aunt and aunt's family), and there is a little mystery and allusion to the greater struggles she is hiding from.

    That said, there are two things I didn't care for: Raven's design and the dialogue of the students.
    - Maybe I'm old, but it felt like sometimes the dialogue the them ungrateful whippersnappers sometimes required a little decryption on my part and felt forced, like the teenager speak of Frank Miller's, "The Dark Knight Returns." "Hey. Mad texted." I couldn't figure out if the character WAS texting or had previously texted without the rest of the dialogue to. And "Things change, it's by the embarcadero," read so oddly to me like if someone was stating they were in an alliance and when betrayed the betrayer replied, "Things change, I'm with them now." It should have read as, "Things change? It's by the embarcadero," or even better, "If things change." It could be that Marv Wolfman is around 70 years old and is trying to interpret how he believes teenagers to talk. The worst part is how the dialogue shifts back and forth sometimes from "regular" to "odd teenage sayings" which throws me off a bit.
    - Raven's attire straight came out of one of two (or both) sources: 90's goth kid, or she ripped off Cassandra Hack and hard. That design is a huge step backwards for Raven and it was just hard to see and wonder if this book wasn't written around 15 or more years ago. There was even a comment about it from some "Mean Girls," though Raven took hilarious revenge.

    But I should say these aren't deal breakers for me. The costume fits the art style and more or less the janky dialogue will either smooth out or I will be forced to catch up with the times (Back in my day we didn't have this sort of speech AND WE LIKED IT).

    Speaking of art...


    Art is a little interesting, can't say I dislike it but it's not thrilling. This is going to catch me so much flak. Ugh... Bear with me. It sort of fits this design I've been seeing emerge for the past few years in books aimed at female readership or younger and/or newer readers. It doesn't necessarily take away from the book, but it makes me look for certain cues which sometimes are there and sometimes not. Probably all in my head as the book is filled with normal comic book stuff. I don't think the art shift is bad for this book (that would go to Patsy Walker, aka Hellcat) but it definitely makes me tilt my head as I flip through the pages of the more exaggerated style since sometimes it wants to have a conformity and then doesn't. But whine as I might the expressions and body language Raven gives off is effective, so Borges is doing something right.

    3/5 out of the gate. Not bad at all. Really interested where this goes, though I get the feeling it ends up with her embracing herself as "both a teenage human girl and a superhero, and (she) will be both!" or something.

  2. #2


    link?

  3. #3
    http://readcomiconline.to/Comic/Raven

    found it



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    dat trolling tho







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    "evil"



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    where is the second issue of this?

  4. #4

  5. #5
    say-and-sing's Avatar
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    I have no idea who Raven is, yet it looked catchy so I gave it a shot.

    The art is nothing to write home about, but compared to many other comic books I tried it is quite good and does it's job. The idea of "superhero/person with unusual background tries out normal life" is nothing new and without background, some jokes might fly over my head, but so far it is entertaining.

    Yet unless the attack is only taking place in Raven's head, I can't help feeling that shit is hitting the fan too soon: end of volume two and everything is going down. So the main hook about the hero trying to blend in and deciding whether to fix/abtain from fixing things with his/her powers has already been thrown out of the window it seems. Raven and her peers have known each other for like two days now? It feels like another run-of-the-mill superhero vs. baddy story.

    Although at the end of vol. one I saw this:


    I hope it doesn't suck a##.


  6. #6
    Skraawwk!! Makenzye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by say-and-sing View Post
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    I have no idea who Raven is, yet it looked catchy so I gave it a shot.

    The art is nothing to write home about, but compared to many other comic books I tried it is quite good and does it's job. The idea of "superhero/person with unusual background tries out normal life" is nothing new and without background, some jokes might fly over my head, but so far it is entertaining.

    Yet unless the attack is only taking place in Raven's head, I can't help feeling that shit is hitting the fan too soon: end of volume two and everything is going down. So the main hook about the hero trying to blend in and deciding whether to fix/abtain from fixing things with his/her powers has already been thrown out of the window it seems. Raven and her peers have known each other for like two days now? It feels like another run-of-the-mill superhero vs. baddy story.

    Although at the end of vol. one I saw this:


    I hope it doesn't suck a##.
    A miniseries determined to make a change to a previous character while trying to retain some of its history means knowledge of the character beforehand is pretty important sometimes. Otherwise people do become a bit confused of their powers and purpose. Thankfully this character isn't using anything too bizarre and people with rudimentary knowledge of her shouldn't have too much trouble catching on.

    But because it's a miniseries the action and plot have to take place near immediately. It's effective as a story telling device for Raven herself, who discovers that despite her desire to change she never really can change what she is at her core: A hero who must do heroic things. This creates an interesting dynamic for someone who's never really had a choice before and can speak to the change within herself as she embraces who she is as opposed to run from it. As she progresses, you can expect that bit you believe she has thrown out will enter back in since she described how she needed her powers. As she grows we will most likely see her dependence on it shorten. Otherwise she'll have to spend several issues spinning her heels and doing nothing. Unlike a shonen manga which releases generally once a week, comics tend to release once a month and so issues of nothing going on is something superhero comics can't do. Especially as most story lines tend to resolve in a handful of issues and not at the luxury of years.


    Though I see what you mean about good/bad generic story. Unfortunately, that's how superhero stories work at their very core. Those with power and moral right versus those with power and moral wrong. Like a slasher, a shonen story, or a romantic comedy follows a certain plot idea so too do superhero comics. While it follows the character and their evolution, the core of it is how they use their powers to fight bad guys. Unless it's a comic about a supervillain, then sometimes they don't.


    As for Mother Panic? I rolled my eyes and groaned. Can't help but feel bad 90's vibes off that character.

  7. #7
    say-and-sing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Makenzye View Post
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    But because it's a miniseries the action and plot have to take place near immediately. It's effective as a story telling device for Raven herself, who discovers that despite her desire to change she never really can change what she is at her core: A hero who must do heroic things. This creates an interesting dynamic for someone who's never really had a choice before and can speak to the change within herself as she embraces who she is as opposed to run from it. As she progresses, you can expect that bit you believe she has thrown out will enter back in since she described how she needed her powers. As she grows we will most likely see her dependence on it shorten. Otherwise she'll have to spend several issues spinning her heels and doing nothing. Unlike a shonen manga which releases generally once a week, comics tend to release once a month and so issues of nothing going on is something superhero comics can't do. Especially as most story lines tend to resolve in a handful of issues and not at the luxury of years.
    Her realising that her heroic powers are part of her and thus a quiet life is not possible and embracing this is not so much the problem as Raven never gets to experience the "normal lifestyle" or gets a choice. She arrives in the evening, has dinner with the family and after a nighttime's sleep she gets scanned/attacked after her first hour of school, half the volume in.

    So basically, after half a day Raven learns that normality is not achievable for her. Which is fine I guess and if the Raven-fans want action then be my guest. I'm just wondering why they bother with the "normal teenager"-thingy for a miniseries if they don't want to take it slow. But maybe my perception of slow is not adjusted to (superhero) comics. OR I just had wrong expectations.

    Quote Originally Posted by Makenzye View Post
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    As for Mother Panic? I rolled my eyes and groaned. Can't help but feel bad 90's vibes off that character.
    That makes me want to read it so much more.

    EDIT from dccomics.com: From Marv Wolfman, co-creator of Raven, [...] comes a 5-issue miniseries delving into Raven's past and giving her a new life — but first she must survive the horrors of high school! Can the Titan's empath endure the wave of teen angst at school, especially after someone begins killing students? Emotions are driven sky high thanks to the reappearance of the Psycho Pirate's Medusa mask, and there's no way anyone can contain it once it has fallen into the wrong hands. Titans fans new and old dare not miss this one!

    Let's see how this developes.
    Last edited by say-and-sing; 10-22-2016 at 04:28 PM.


  8. #8
    Skraawwk!! Makenzye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by say-and-sing View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Her realising that her heroic powers are part of her and thus a quiet life is not possible and embracing this is not so much the problem as Raven never gets to experience the "normal lifestyle" or gets a choice. She arrives in the evening, has dinner with the family and after a nighttime's sleep she gets scanned/attacked after her first hour of school, half the volume in.

    So basically, after half a day Raven learns that normality is not achievable for her. Which is fine I guess and if the Raven-fans want action then be my guest. I'm just wondering why they bother with the "normal teenager"-thingy for a miniseries if they don't want to take it slow. But maybe my perception of slow is not adjusted to (superhero) comics. OR I just had wrong expectations.



    That makes me want to read it so much more.

    EDIT from dccomics.com: From Marv Wolfman, co-creator of Raven, [...] comes a 5-issue miniseries delving into Raven's past and giving her a new life — but first she must survive the horrors of high school! Can the Titan's empath endure the wave of teen angst at school, especially after someone begins killing students? Emotions are driven sky high thanks to the reappearance of the Psycho Pirate's Medusa mask, and there's no way anyone can contain it once it has fallen into the wrong hands. Titans fans new and old dare not miss this one!

    Let's see how this developes.
    There's actually something to really talk about in what you said, but I think the brief and short of it is what's important below:


    You nailed it with talk about expectations. You've been reading some comics so you should understand the general pacing and story flow (unless you've been skipping a bunch of parts and only reading the action), but expectations tend to throw wrenches in people's reading experiences. And I can't blame you at that since you might not be that receptive to a story like this.



    And ugh. 90's edge heroes. Ugh. There's a reason the industry left those behind so long ago. A good reason. You and I will never agree on that.

  9. #9
    Skraawwk!! Makenzye's Avatar
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    So the Penultimate Issue dropped last Wednesday.

    Unfortunately the issue starts with Raven trying desperately to convince people to not go in. It seems like we've been covering this since issue one and it starts to feel boring. I get that this is meant to be a big thing for Raven, but I'm just tired of it. It finally ends on a good note, though.

    It's sort of funny seeing Rachel's ultra religious family react to the news Raven may be a demon, or at least of demonic descent.
    "God, it’s me. Please help me save my cousin. Even if she dresses all in black.” One of the best lines ever.

  10. #10
    Banned Cake's Avatar
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    Raven is my favorite Titan and recently watched the Judas Movie (that is like an alternative universe from an arc of teen titans go) and loved how she is pretty much paired with Batman's son.

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