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  1. #381
    Crispickle's Avatar
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    yep

    that's really warfare for dummies 1.0, as in that's knowledge you can't really go without in certain lines of work


  2. #382
    Knight of Romance Heart's Avatar
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    Some of sun tzu's proverbs were applicable to Go if I remember correctly

  3. #383
    Although his advices may seem like simple and pretty straightforward in the book, the guy was legit one of the greatest generals in terms of strategising in battle.

  4. #384
    @Pimp of Pimps @White @Makenzye @Ichiryuu @Crispickle @Juan @Emperor Whitebeard;

    Continuing on the topic of east asian history. The Battle of Jieting is a classic example of relying to much on the books.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Jieting

    Fought between Shu Han and Cao Wei kingdoms, in the early 3rd century AD. The Wei army attacked the crucial strategic location of Jie Ting in order to cut off supplies for Shu Han's expedition against them. Shu's chancellor Zhuge Liang sent his general Ma Su to counter the enemy and explicitly ordered him not to make camp on high ground, but check the enemy along the road.

    Once he arrived on location however, Ma Su thought it was better to capture the hill overlooking the valley, despite his fellow officer Wang Ping urging him to stay close to the water supplies in the city. As he had expected, the Wei army encircled the hill and cut of the water supplies for Ma Su, later setting fire to the hill. Wang Ping's relief force was defeated and Ma Su's force was crushed. After he returned Ma Su was set to be executed, having pledged his life for the defense of Jieting, but died in prison.

    After this loss, the Shu Army was nearly cut off and had to abandon their expedition north due to a shortage of supplies.

  5. #385
    @Pimp of Pimps @White @Makenzye @Ichiryuu @Crispickle @Juan @Emperor Whitebeard;

    download.jpg

    The sica knife. Its curved shape was designed so that it can bypass the enemy's shield. Used extensively by the romans, dacians, illyrians and thracians. The etymology of the word is of proto-indo european origin, meaning "to cut." In our language a knife is still called "thika", very similar to sica. A similiar word is used in a couple other languages I think for cutting.

  6. #386
    Ichiryuu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emperor Whitebeard View Post
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    @Pimp of Pimps @White @Makenzye @Ichiryuu @Crispickle @Juan @Emperor Whitebeard;

    download.jpg

    The sica knife. Its curved shape was designed so that it can bypass the enemy's shield. Used extensively by the romans, dacians, illyrians and thracians. The etymology of the word is of proto-indo european origin, meaning "to cut." In our language a knife is still called "thika", very similar to sica. A similiar word is used in a couple other languages I think for cutting.
    Was it supposed to cut the arm or hand or just anything really?

    RIP Chester, you'll always be loved and missed.




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  7. #387
    Quote Originally Posted by Emperor Whitebeard View Post
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    @Pimp of Pimps @White @Makenzye @Ichiryuu @Crispickle @Juan @Emperor Whitebeard;

    download.jpg

    The sica knife. Its curved shape was designed so that it can bypass the enemy's shield. Used extensively by the romans, dacians, illyrians and thracians. The etymology of the word is of proto-indo european origin, meaning "to cut." In our language a knife is still called "thika", very similar to sica. A similiar word is used in a couple other languages I think for cutting.

    Nice. How big are they, usually? I might get something like this for my collection, if I can find a good quality one.
    No.​

  8. #388
    Quote Originally Posted by Ichiryuu View Post
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    Was it supposed to cut the arm or hand or just anything really?
    Mainly the arm holding the shield. It was also used by illyrian assasins called sicarius to carry out stealthy assassinations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pimp of Pimps View Post
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    Nice. How big are they, usually? I might get something like this for my collection, if I can find a good quality one.
    Somewhere around 30-40 cm in length and 3 cm in width.

  9. #389
    Ichiryuu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emperor Whitebeard View Post
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    Mainly the arm holding the shield. It was also used by illyrian assasins called sicarius to carry out stealthy assassinations.
    Was the aim for the enemy to drop their shields, or just wound/weaken in general

    RIP Chester, you'll always be loved and missed.




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  10. #390
    Quote Originally Posted by Ichiryuu View Post
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    Was the aim for the enemy to drop their shields, or just wound/weaken in general
    Wound or weaken. This would stab the opponent from the side, causing as much damage as possible.

  11. #391
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pimp of Pimps View Post
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    Nice. How big are they, usually? I might get something like this for my collection, if I can find a good quality one.
    they're pretty short, not longer than gladii, so around 50cm or 60cm tops. Haven't seen longer than this.

    for what i know, they were not the most efficient weapon in a face to face battle, but it had a large use among gladiators because that's the kind of thing that allowed a lot of blood splattering but with the least risk of being fatal


  12. #392
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emperor Whitebeard View Post
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    Wound or weaken. This would stab the opponent from the side, causing as much damage as possible.
    I see, but I imagine if this bypasses shields and cuts the arm (assuming the one holding the shield) the enemy would be forced to drop their shields and they end up way more open.

    RIP Chester, you'll always be loved and missed.




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  13. #393
    Quote Originally Posted by Crispickle View Post
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    they're pretty short, not longer than gladii, so around 50cm or 60cm tops. Haven't seen longer than this.

    for what i know, they were not the most efficient weapon in a face to face battle, but it had a large use among gladiators because that's the kind of thing that allowed a lot of blood splattering but with the least risk of being fatal
    True this was used mostly in gladiator fights or assassinations.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ichiryuu View Post
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    I see, but I imagine if this bypasses shields and cuts the arm (assuming the one holding the shield) the enemy would be forced to drop their shields and they end up way more open.
    Yeah, this would do some nasty damage to the arm holding the shield. It might go as far as immobilizing the army entirely that's true. That's the reason many gladiators used it. Although it doesn't kill you right away, it allows for a lot of blood to be spilled, as Crispy said.
    Last edited by Whitebeard; 02-18-2018 at 07:00 PM.

  14. #394
    @Pimp of Pimps @White @Makenzye @Ichiryuu @Crispickle @Juan @Emperor Whitebeard;

    While researching some topics, I came across the celtic invasion of the Balkans. After this capaign, many called the tresure of Delphi, the cursed treasure.

    The celtic warriors coming from the north, embarked on the Great Expedition, with at least 150.000 troops.
    The celts were able to subdue tribes north of Illyria, the present day Croatia, Bosnia and northern Serbia. They succeded in defeating one of the most powerful tribes of the north, the Autaritae. Their goal was the reach the wealthy greek city-states, mainly the city of Delphi, where there was a famous treasure. In their way there stood the powerful kingdom of Macedonia. Although all the balkan states were very careful and took measures to deal with the celtic invasion, the macedonian king Ptolemy, was largely unfazed by the celts' advance. The Dardanian Kingdom offered as much as 20.000 troops to support Macedonia against the celts, despite the illyrians and macedonians being in a struggle for superiority for centuries, over the province of Paionia, or present day FYROM. Ptolemy rudely rejected the assistance. The dardanian king Monunius, is recorded to have said that the once great kingdom of Macedonia would fall because of a young man's foolishness.

    And so did happen. The celtic army under Bolgios routed the macedonians in battle and killed Ptolemy. A macedonian noble under the name of Sosthenes, was able to reorganise the defense and drive back Bolgios, but another celtic general, Brennus, defeated him and raided Macedonia. After that, the celtic troops marched towards the greek city states. They clashed with the athenians in the Battle of Thermopylae, but were badly defeated. Furthermore, the celts retreated into Dardania. The dardanians retaliated hard. It is said that the celtic army was all but wiped out in dardanian lands.

    This Great Expedition, as the celts called it, turned disastrous. It is one of the most brutal defeats the celts have suffered.
    Last edited by Whitebeard; 02-18-2018 at 07:25 PM.

  15. #395
    @Pimp of Pimps @White @Makenzye @Ichiryuu @Crispickle @Juan @Emperor Whitebeard;

    The oldest flags in the world that are still in use. Ranked by the year of adoption.


    Scotland-Wood-Flag-1_1024x1024.jpg
    The Flag of Scotland originated in 832 AD, during a battle fought in the dark ages. It is known as Europe’s oldest flag. Often referred to as The Scotland Saltire, Saltire, or St Andrew's Cross, the Flag of Scotland uses an azure background. It’s design is bold and unique with a simple blue field and white saltire.

    According to tradition, it represents Saint Andrew, who is supposed to have been crucified on a cross of that form. The St. Andrew's Cross was worn as a badge on hats in Scotland on the day of the feast of St. Andrew.

    2000px-Flag_of_Austria_1024x1024.jpg
    2. AUSTRIA (Adopted 1230)



    The flag of Austria entertains three equal horizontal stripes of red, white, and red. Historically, the design is based on the coat of arms of the Babenberg dynasty, and at first the flag was orange-white-blue, but later the orange and blue stripes became red.

    According to legend, the flag was invented by Duke Leopold V of Austria as a consequence of his fighting during the Siege of Acre (1189-1191). After a fierce battle, his white surcoat was completely drenched in blood. When he removed his belt, the cloth underneath was strikingly white, revealing the color combination of red-white-red. So taken was he by this singular sight that he adopted the colors and scheme as Austria’s flag.

    Though the Austrian Flag was in the works in 1105, it wasn’t officially adopted until 1230.
    Screen_Shot_2016-03-14_at_9.52.31_PM_1024x1024.jpg
    3. LATVIA (1280)



    One of the oldest flags in the world, the Flag of Latvia was first mentioned in medieval chronicle called the Rhymed Chronicle of Livonia in 1280. The chronicle mentions a red standard with a white stripe being used by Latvian tribes.

    According to the LatvianHistory.com, “when the leader of Ancient Latvian Semigallian tribe lead the attack against the Teutonic Crusader controlled Riga, Latgalian soldiers from Cēsis came to support the crusaders. The Latgalians came with red-white-red flag that chronicler called the ‘flag of the letts.’”

    A legend refers to a mortally wounded chief of a Latvian tribe who was wrapped in a white sheet. The part of the sheet on which he was lying remained white, but the two edges were stained in his blood. During the next battle the bloodstained sheet was used as a flag. According to the legend this time the Latvian warriors were successful and drove the enemy away.


    Flag_of_Denmark_1024x1024.jpg
    4. DENMARK (Adopted 1307 or earlier)



    Known as the known as the 'Dannebrog' or 'Danish cloth,' in Denmark, the the current design of a white Scandinavian cross on a red background was officially adopted in 1307 or earlier. The Flag of Denmark also holds the Guinness World Record for the oldest continuously used national flag.

    According to legend, the flag came into Danish possession during the Battle of Lyndanisse in 1219. The Danes were on a failing crusade in Estonia, but after praying to God, a flag fell from the sky. After this event, Danish King Valdemar II went on to defeat the Estonians. The first recorded use of the flag appeared less than 100 years later. This legend has no historical or factual record, though many hold it to be true.

    Sources note that while Denmark was never part of the Roman Empire, similar designs were used by the Empire to represent provinces, as the white cross is symbolic of Christianity. The cross design was later adopted by other Nordic countries such as Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Iceland.

    Flag_of_Albania_1024x1024.jpg

    5. ALBANIA (1443)



    The Flag of Albania consists of a red field (background) with a black two-headed eagle in its center. The first sighting of Albania’s flag was on on November 28, 1443, when Skanderbeg (George Kastrioti), the national hero of Albania, raised his flag over the fortress of Krujë in defiance of the Turks who ruled the country. The unique double-headed eagle design was borrowed from the Byzantine Empire.

    The symbol of the double-headed eagle was re-used by Albanian nationalists during the late 19th and early 20th centuries as a symbol of their campaign for their country's independence from the Ottoman Empire. On November 28, 1912, the Albanian Declaration of Independence was proclaimed, and the flag was officially adopted.

  16. #396
    Interesting that all the oldest flags are European. Cool stuff.
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  17. #397
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pimp of Pimps View Post
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    Interesting that all the oldest flags are European. Cool stuff.
    That two-headed eagle the Albanians use is a very ancient symbol. The freaking Hittites were using it 2,000 years before the Byzantines adopted it. I remember reading somewhere that the symbol was likely revived by Muslim Iberians who previously came in contact with it in Assyria.


  18. #398
    Quote Originally Posted by Crispinianus View Post
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    That two-headed eagle the Albanians use is a very ancient symbol. The freaking Hittites were using it 2,000 years before the Byzantines adopted it. I remember reading somewhere that the symbol was likely revived by Muslim Iberians who previously came in contact with it in Assyria.

    Interesting indeed. We must do more research on this topic.
    No.​

  19. #399


    Bought this book just now. Should arrive in around a week.
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  20. #400
    @Pimp of Pimps @White @Makenzye @Ichiryuu @Crispickle @Juan @Emperor Whitebeard;

    World War II: European Theatre.

    This simulation shows how the front changed covering all days of the conflict in only a few minues.

    https://youtu.be/WOVEy1tC7nk

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