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  1. #761

  2. #762
    Juan's Avatar
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    They're missing the intervention in '62 of Dominican Republic and the Trujillo Assassination.

  3. #763
    Quote Originally Posted by Juan View Post
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    They're missing the intervention in '62 of Dominican Republic and the Trujillo Assassination.

    Good catch.
    No.​

  4. #764
    Banned Whitebeard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crispickle View Post
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    of course man

    I reenact, remember

    And I'm too poor to buy them
    Explain us the process.

  5. #765
    Crispickle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whitebeard View Post
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    Explain us the process.
    of making a sword?

    we make the model and cut it with the laser. Then we edge it with sandpaper. Then you add the wooden handle by pretty much making the lower part of the blade purposely to fit the opening. That's how we made all our gladii, falcatae and one kopis.


  6. #766
    Banned Whitebeard's Avatar
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    @Pimp of Pimps @Perun @White @Makenzye @baji17 @Ichiryuu @Neko @Crispickle @Wiskodeh @Juan @DreX @Whitebeard @Usopp;

    Compressed air weapon, built by Bartholomeus Girandoni in 1779.


  7. #767
    Quote Originally Posted by Perun View Post
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    This kinda makes me sad. It used to be such a pretty little city. Absolutely crazy how fast stuff can expand

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Whitebeard View Post
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    This is super neat.
    http://www.millenniumforums.com/signaturepics/sigpic12330_1.gif

  8. #768
    Banned Whitebeard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zu View Post
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    This kinda makes me sad. It used to be such a pretty little city. Absolutely crazy how fast stuff can expand

    - - - Updated - - -



    This is super neat.
    Join our group

  9. #769
    Quote Originally Posted by Whitebeard View Post
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    Join our group
    Lol, maybe
    http://www.millenniumforums.com/signaturepics/sigpic12330_1.gif

  10. #770
    Banned Whitebeard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zu View Post
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    Lol, maybe
    Just ask Pops if you ever wanna join

  11. #771
    Banned Whitebeard's Avatar
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    @Pimp of Pimps @Perun @White @Makenzye @baji17 @Ichiryuu @Neko @Crispickle @Wiskodeh @Juan @DreX @Whitebeard @Usopp;

    https://youtu.be/KdQwalCPNAs

    Expansion of indo-european languages. (Dunno what to think of this one tbh. Seems very innaccurate )

    https://youtu.be/AvFl6UBZLv4

    Expansion of religions.

    Both short and interesting simulations.
    Last edited by Whitebeard; 07-13-2018 at 04:31 PM.

  12. #772
    @Pimp of Pimps @Perun @White @Makenzye @baji17 @Ichiryuu @Neko @Crispickle @Wiskodeh @Juan @DreX @Whitebeard @Usopp;

    "The market was also a cultural melting pot. The most famous example ofthis is Basra, the home of one of the early ‘Abbasid age’s most unique men ofletters, al-Jahiz, who recounted that his education took place not only in theGreat Mosque of Basra but also in the Mirbad marketplace west of the citywhere he joined with the storytellers to collect Arabic ‘verses by madmenand Bedouin brigands ... [and] works by Jewish poets’.4 In so doing heattempted to preserve Arabic language and lore in a city which was themeeting point between Arabic and Persian speakers and cultures and hecontributed to the formulation of an important strand within Arabic belleslettres. The market area of any city was also the place where visitors couldfind accommodation in the form of the funduq, a hostelry related in nameand function to the earlier Byzantine pandocheion and the inns of the HolyLand, known in Aramaic as pundaq."





    In regards to the Abbasids era.

    From the book "The Great Caliphs: The Golden Age of theAbbasid Empire.
    No.​

  13. #773
    @Pimp of Pimps @Perun @White @Makenzye @baji17 @Ichiryuu @Neko @Crispickle @Wiskodeh @Juan @DreX @Whitebeard @Usopp;

    The above references to streams and springs remind us that water isalways crucial to city life. For Muslims, flowing water was an integral partof their image of a garden and paradise itself. In the often hot and arid landsof Islam, the provision of water for the thirsty was a sacred duty and water



    was also essential for performing the required ritual ablutions before prayer.The practical, ritual and symbolic importance of providing water manifesteditself in the Muslims’ considerable devotion to hydraulic engineering, anarea in which they showed ingenuity as well as expertise. Water was trans-ported to cities by all manner of aqueducts, canals and deep-bored wells.All great mosques had ablution areas and often public lavatories and everyurban quarter had one or more bath houses with hot and cold water on tap.These facilities either used stored water from cisterns or, where possible,natural springs within cities. At Mayyarfariqin in northern Mesopotamia,the congregational mosque had an impressive sanitation system:


    Briefly, the ablution pool faces forty chambers, through each of which run two large channels, one of which is visible and for use, while the other is concealed beneath the earth and is for carrying away refuse and flushing the cisterns.




    From the same book.
    Last edited by Pimp of Pimps; 07-15-2018 at 05:40 PM.
    No.​

  14. #774
    @Pimp of Pimps @Perun @White @Makenzye @baji17 @Ichiryuu @Neko @Crispickle @Wiskodeh @Juan @DreX @Whitebeard @Usopp;

    Hospitals in the Abbasid era:

    The foundation of hospitals in North Africa coincided with Salah al-Din’s activities in Egypt. The late twelfth-century Almohad caliph Ya‘qubal-Mansur founded a famous hospital in Marrakesh which the historianal-Marrakushi, one of the city’s native sons, believed unparalleled in theworld. He reported that the caliph selected a choice spot in the city andcommanded the builders to embellish the hospital with all manner of carv-ing and decoration. He also ordered the planting of perfumed and fruit-bearing trees inside and the installation of flowing water to all the roomsin addition to four pools in the central courtyard. He then ordered richfurnishings of wool, cotton, silk and leather and allocated the hospital 30dinars a day for food and expenses, excluding medical costs, stipulating thatpatients should be given appropriate night clothes depending on the season.Finally he appointed a pharmacist to make potions, creams and powdersfor the patients.54 He may also have founded a hospital in Spain, althoughIbn al-Khatib, a fourteenth-century scholar and courtier from Granada,insisted that the first hospital built in Islamic Spain was that commissionedby Muhammad V in Granada, which was completed in 1367.
    No.​

  15. #775
    @Crispickle;

    The basic term for a partnership was sharika, which was widely used inlegal literature for all kinds of asset-sharing, including shared inheritances,that entailed partnership between two individuals who agreed to pool theircapital, labour or goods and then share whatever risks and profits resultedfrom the venture in agreed proportions. The mudaraba, qirad or muqaradawas a more specialized partnership in which a wealthy merchant or indi-vidual or group of individuals provided all the investment in the form ofcurrency with which an agent purchased goods, traded with them and paidhis business costs. The investor(s) carried the entire risk of the venture but,as a result, also had the right to a larger share of the profits than the agentwho did the actual work but did not risk any financial loss. The investor orgroup of investors trusted the agent to manage their funds appropriatelyand, at the stipulated end of the contract, return the capital plus a share ofthe profits. Such mudaraba or qirad arrangements were very useful in long-distance trade and also provided a mechanism by which money could be lentfor profit without contravening usury prohibitions – here the profit officiallycame from trade rather than the lending of capital per se. Although there isdisagreement on this point, these arrangements used by Muslim and Jewishmerchants may have been the inspiration for the commenda agreements lateradopted by the Italian city-states. They have also provided the basis for thedevelopment of modern Islamic banking.
    Do you know anything about the commenda agreements referenced here?
    No.​

  16. #776

  17. #777
    Chess Master Game Master's Avatar
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    Now that I think about it... I live the country that's the cause of world war 1

    Austro-Hungarian period. Prince Franz Ferdinand was going to Sarajevo when he got ambushed and both him and his wife got shot. His wife was pregnant at the time and she was shot in the abdomen, while the prince got shot in the neck.

    The interesting part about this though isn't that he simply died... But how he died. The prince usually wore these military garments or whatever they're called. It had 2 layers, and in order to look good he had both layers sown together to basically have a "perfect fit". So when he got shot in the neck and reached the hospital he died because they couldn't remove the bullet... It was lodged in his neck with the thick fabric.

    Although it's an interesting historical fact of how he died... No one really knows for sure if this was REALLY the cause of his death, if it was even possible to survive even if he hadn't sown both layers together and all that stuff.

    Also his wife died (if memory serves) when they arrived to the hospital while the prince died 10 minutes or so after.

    After that you had the inner conflict of the royal family (who will take the throne basically) and voila... Spark for World War 1
    Stay a while, and listen!

    I am the great mighty poo, and Im going to throw my shit at you.

    Get over here!

    The Game Master, here to create amazing games for everyone!


  18. #778
    @Pimp of Pimps @Perun @White @Makenzye @baji17 @Ichiryuu @Neko @Crispickle @Wiskodeh @Juan @DreX @Whitebeard @Usopp;

    From the same book

    "Although it is very difficultto compare wages across ,000 years, a good translator might receive 500gold dinars, roughly equivalent to $24,000, per month for his labours, aprincely sum which is a significant indicator of the appetite for translationsamong the early ‘Abbasid elite and their respect for knowledge.22 Moreoveral-Nadim, writing in the last decades of the tenth century, gives a list ofnearly 70 known, and by that we may assume prestigious, translators.23"

    Referring to the Abbasid translation movement.
    No.​

  19. #779
    ⚜️⚜️⚜️⚜️⚜️⚜️⚜️⚜️⚜️⚜️ Saki's Avatar
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    Graham Hancock & Carlson on Joe Rogan podcast: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ANEw0g_M7k

    Talking about a lot of stuff and a global flood in the past that is bound to repeat again...soon

    If you're not familiar with the 20 to 11.000 year ago's global flood, check the theory on youtube. I bumped into it because I was fascinated with some ancient Megaliths and how impossible it was to construct with the supposed available tools at the time.

    Briefly: Before 11.000 years ago, there were more advanced civilizations, a flood wiped most of them off but survivers with watered-down knowledge (pun intended!) tried to....to be continued
    Last edited by Saki; 08-07-2018 at 07:00 PM.

  20. #780
    See you in the desert... Makenzye's Avatar
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    Once upon a time McDonalds tried to sell fried onion bites before chicken mcnuggets.

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